Lessons living with Mohanji – Days 135 & 136

Christopher Greenwood

Day 135 Lesson – Making a change 

Good morning everybody. I hope that you’re doing well. 

Awareness is increasing about the blatant racism incident that happened to Mohanji at Frankfurt Airport, and more people are coming forward to support it. Momentum is building, and we are exploring all avenues to bring this incident to those who can make a change. The reason we are doing this is to change the pattern of injustice that is systemic at Frankfurt Airport and others across the world. We want people to be treated with respect regardless of their race, nationality or skin colour. 

Since my post on FB, many people have now come forward to share their experiences of outright discrimination under the pretext of “security checks”; through my research, I read about many such incidents. This change is needed so no one else has to experience this harassment. People are now afraid to travel through airports and security screening, which is terrible when you think about it. You’re making legitimate travel somewhere, but you’re extremely concerned as you’re going through that security check-in about what’s going to happen to you, how you’re going to be treated and if you’re going to be subjected to abuse. 

 This is the change we want to make so nobody else has to suffer. It can be practical steps in what that change is about, namely:

  1. The right training for the people in these positions of power is to handle people with respect, good ethics, and good behaviour.
  2. Not to treat people as suspects when they’re moving through these airports. People who have experienced this can give feedback so there can be a learning for the airport authorities – a system where they can recognize what’s happening, maybe even a ranking. Things can be done, and this is what we’re pushing for. 

Yesterday, I was pondering on the usual responses, which can happen in a situation like this as the profile has been raised to quite a level. What are the typical things that people will do? What will people say? I think the usual way, which is being experienced now is usually as below:

  1. It didn’t happen – minimizing it, trivializing it, which is sheer avoidance.
  2. Then the next one will be – “Well, that’s obviously just a routine check. That happens to everybody. The police and guards were doing their job; the world is dangerous. Those checks are important.” So basically, trying to justify the situation and the actions. Again, altogether avoiding it, escapism. 
  3. If they can’t handle what’s coming, can’t accept any mistakes, or can’t find any other way to avoid it, then what could happen is that they look to slander the person involved. They talk bad about the person. They make them look like a demon so that whatever happened to them is justified, “Okay, he was a bad guy, so what you did was right anyway.” And they can even pay people for this. 

I was thinking on these lines because, under pressure to attempt to save themselves and face, they could resort to many options, trying to make a diversion from the actual issue at hand. They can shame a person into justifying their actions.

 I remember someone telling me about an incident that happened in Pakistan. One man was working for a bank, and he killed his boss. This was because he had asked for a salary increase or a promotion, and the boss hadn’t given it to him. He wasn’t happy with that and killed the boss. 

When the police handled this person, he said his boss had spoken badly about the Quran and defamed the Prophet, speaking all sorts of bad things. So straight away, this became a huge thing, and this person became a hero as he had taken revenge on someone who spoke badly about the Quran and the Prophet. It completely eclipsed the fact that he’d murdered someone, and then the court should have meted out the justice he deserved for committing murder in the country. 

I thought that there might even be a paid slander or smear campaign so that the whole issue could be eclipsed and avoided. But we keep going because we have a clear purpose now: to bring a change to this pattern of injustice. 

Hope you have a great day ahead.

Day 136 Lesson – Ahimsa 

Good morning everybody. 

Today, I wanted to start with a quote I shared some weeks back that has enduring relevance. Albert Einstein said, “The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.” Yesterday Mohanji gave a compelling talk and clarification about why we’ve decided to take a stand against racism, racial profiling, and the harassment people are subjected to at the airport security checks. Especially in Frankfurt Airport, where he was harassed, which happened once before. 

In this meeting with the country heads, the leaders of the teams, and the advisors, Mohanji clarified the incident at Frankfurt and the reason for taking a stand. This is not personal; it’s to bring a change in the world so that no one else has to suffer that harassment, racism and outright discrimination. Since the incident, all the activities have been happening to make sure that things are visible to people; the right people and higher authorities are being contacted. 

Over the past days, some people had worries, concerns and confusion about whether our activities to raise the visibility of this issue were in line with Ahimsa or non-violence, one of our core principles. So Mohanji clarified Ahimsa really well. 

He said that Ahimsa is not creating violence in thoughts, words or actions. It’s ensuring that no one is harmed because of our thoughts, words and actions. So it’s about our interaction with the world. But that doesn’t mean that we lie down and become a doormat for everybody. We also have to protect ourselves and take action based on the merits of the issue at hand. So not that we outwardly go out and attack somebody, but we assess what it is and then take the appropriate action. 

After the meeting yesterday, we spoke some more. Mohanji explained it in a way that sometimes you have to act. For example, what would you do if somebody is coming to you with a knife, intending to harm you or kill you? You can’t ask them to sit down and meditate and think about what they’re doing. You have to handle it as it is. Or, if a mosquito is coming and biting, you can’t calmly sit, chant and hope it will go away. You have to do something about it. 

The incident with Frankfurt is not personal. It’s for a much larger good where many people have experienced this traumatic treatment, and probably all across the world, something similar is happening. These people don’t have the platform, the voice, or outreach, which we do.

He shared some more clarifications or illustrations about Ahimsa to further my understanding. We spoke about Krishna, and he said that, like Krishna, he likes to be practical. Krishna waged many wars, and many people died in those battles. Pretty much all the kings at the time were wiped out. The act of war, fighting, and death could be seen as violence, and there would have been some. But it was done for a much larger purpose; for Dharma, for a greater good. So like that, each action can be taking on what it’s doing for others.

Something else which I liked from Mohanji’s briefing yesterday with all of the country heads and team leaders is that he reiterated that we should speak when we can, when we have the time, when we have the opportunity, and when we have a voice. He said that’s especially important because if we don’t, if we’re passive, then this is the example we are setting for the next generation to come. And we leave them also the burden of what we had to carry. 

I hope you have a great day ahead and will speak to you soon.

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|| JAI BRAHMARISHI MOHANJI ||

Edited & Published by – Testimonials Team, 19th June 2022

Disclaimer:

The views, opinions, and positions expressed by the authors and those providing comments on these blogs are theirs alone and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of Mohanji, Mohanji Foundation, it’s members, employees or any other individual or entity associated with Mohanji or Mohanji Foundation. We make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, timeliness, suitability or validity of any information presented by individual authors and/or commenters on our blogs and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use.

We reserve the right to delete, edit, or alter in any manner we see fit blog entries or comments that we, in our sole discretion, deem to be obscene, offensive, defamatory, threatening, in violation of trademark, copyright or other laws, of an express commercial nature, or otherwise unacceptable.

Mohanji Testimonials team

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Mohanji’s silent message to a devotee

By Charles Ndifon Londi, Canada

Mohanji advocates a vegan lifestyle, and this makes sense when viewed from the ahimsa (non-violence to all sentient beings) perspective. The beauty of his style is that it is suggestive and not forced upon the devotee, and this enables him/her to handle the changes that come with adherence to Consciousness Kriya (a lifestyle of humility, non-violence, gratitude and purity). And so, quite frankly, some will give up meat and meat products slowly and in a natural way. 

It will come from within and not so much from without. However, along the way, there will be silent nudges and reminders from Mohanji of the virtues of leading a vegan lifestyle. This is what happened to a Mohanji devotee in the Congo Democratic Republic, Joseph, whom I jokingly call Tonton Jeff, the grand Hindu of Congo. The story that follows is about his experience, and he has granted me permission to narrate it for the edification of all.

On account of many household chores, he had to engage another housemaid soon after, the former one left. After some time, he realized that the new housemaid, unlike the former one, would not eat whenever food was served with meat. Joseph decided to ask her why she was behaving in that way. The young lady told him she is a Christian, and the Pastor of her church discourages the eating of animal flesh. 

The young lady to whom I spoke said all congregation members are strict vegetarians. The church members come together and produce something that resembles meat from non-animal ingredients, and this is sold to congregants as a viable food source. So the encounter with meat at Joseph’s home caused her to become squeamish, and she just kept away whenever food with traces of animal flesh was served. 

The run-up to this situation, she said, was her health which was never good until she joined this Christian church where fasting and prayers were done, and the eating of meat in all forms was eschewed. Thereafter, she was relieved of all her health afflictions, she said, and that is why she could not go back to eating animal flesh. And here, the silent but audible voice of Mohanji comes in. 

In my conversation with Joseph, he himself told me that he understood this subtle message from Mohanji through his housemaid and that he’ll make efforts to be like her housemaid too. I was very thrilled by this story which illustrates the use of what some call the ‘Golden Tongued’ wisdom by great Masters operating in the Supreme God Consciousness/Awareness to pass across messages without saying a word directly to the person for whom a message is destined. 

It may be through even a mad man, a signpost, a billboard, radio or television advertisement, a casual statement by a friend or stranger, etc. Joseph’s housemaid’s story made me wake up to the voice of Guru Mohanji, the voice of God, all around me, and this may well be a message for anyone else.

From the maid’s experience, I deduce that even if one were not a spiritually-minded person, a vegan lifestyle has a huge positive impact on one’s personal health, which is a plus, not a minus. I have, since becoming a Kriya Yogi, tried to do some research on human beings and meat-eating, and this is what I found out. 

The intestines of human beings aren’t designed to handle meat, so man is actually a herbivore (eating leaves and plants). If a herbivore eats meat (man, for example), it takes a very long time to exit the body, putrifies and produces noxious gases and all kinds of toxins that compromise health. 

It cannot be gainsaid that human beings, who are by nature herbivores, don’t have a problem with meat digestion and excretion. Perhaps Joseph’s housemaid’s story of chronic ill health and becoming well and vibrant after she stopped eating meat is a good signpost for anyone who cares nothing about spirituality but just wants to improve their health. One may well stumble on Mohanji’s guidance to physical and spiritual healing in the process. 

|| JAI BRAHMARISHI MOHANJI ||

Edited & Published by – Testimonials Team, 19th May 2022

Disclaimer:

The views, opinions, and positions expressed by the authors and those providing comments on these blogs are theirs alone and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of Mohanji, Mohanji Foundation, it’s members, employees or any other individual or entity associated with Mohanji or Mohanji Foundation. We make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, timeliness, suitability or validity of any information presented by individual authors and/or commenters on our blogs and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use.

We reserve the right to delete, edit, or alter in any manner we see fit blog entries or comments that we, in our sole discretion, deem to be obscene, offensive, defamatory, threatening, in violation of trademark, copyright or other laws, of an express commercial nature, or otherwise unacceptable.

Mohanji Testimonials team

Lessons living with Mohanji – Days 27 & 28

By Christopher Greenwood

Day 27 Lesson – Harmony and Ahimsa️ at home 

Good morning, everybody. I hope you’re doing well. 

Today, I wanted to share an aspect of Mohanji’s core living teachings: Ahimsa or non-violence. The morning was really nice; it was sunny; it was calm, very peaceful. I went to see Mohanji in the morning to talk about daily activities. He was also equally calm today. He was writing a piece in response to a request for a magazine article. 

He had the window open. So in the room, he has his chair, and he faces the door as you come in. Just to the left of him, there’s a nice window. In the morning, he raises the blind, and he opens the window. He has a clear eyeshot of the trees outside and the neighbouring piece of the garden from his chair. 

This is where every morning, the birds come, and they’ll stay for the morning time with Mohanji. They’ll sit there on the branches. Many come to see him, they have their breakfast, as I’ve mentioned before, and then they stay for some time. Even the squirrels, they’re enthusiastic to see him too. 

In the morning, he sat there with the window open so that they could come and see him, and they’re happy and content. So each morning, this happens; they have their food, and they stay for some time. It’s a very calm, harmonious atmosphere. 

Today, there was a bit of silence, so we listened to the birds for a bit. They were making really interesting sounds, sounds of deep contentment as they chirped and sang from the trees. They had their food. Mohanji spoke that this is their way of showing gratitude. They understand where the food has come from and from where it has been given. 

He said, “When you listen carefully, and you become more attuned to nature, you can actually feel the communication.” Most of the time, we’re not so aware of it because we’re so busy within, so occupied with our mind. But he says that when beings around the house are happy and peaceful, and when they are content, that brings grace to the home. So by serving them, giving them food, by giving them contentment, they bring grace to the house.

I can relate this back to Ahimsa or non-violence, that Mohanji practices and lives. Even now, when I speak to him, he always says that he doesn’t want to bind anyone; he thinks people should be completely free to experience whatever they want in life. If somebody wants to drink, that’s fine. If they want to go out and party, that’s fine. If they want to do something else, that’s fine. He has no real interest in that, from the point of view of right or wrong. He thinks everyone should have the free will to do whatever they want. Because in the end, it’s the individual who will be paying for whatever they’re doing, either through their body or through whatever else they’re accruing. 

The one condition that he does say is that whatever activity is done, it should not harm another being. So anything is fine, provided it’s consensual and non-harmful, non-violent. This is the main reason why he practices veganism, because of all the violence and the exploitation of millions of beings across the world, just for somebody else’s taste, just for somebody else’s satisfaction. So, he is against all the cruelty that’s involved, the suffering, and the violence. That’s why he promotes and practices veganism. 

He spoke a little bit more about this today because of his interaction with the birds. We are, as a being, constantly transmitting who we are, whether we’re aware of it or not. So what’s inside us, we’re transmitting out to the world, we’re projecting out as a subtle frequency. We’re constantly transmitting our own personal frequency, which is made up of our patterns, inclinations, habits, or attitudes towards life.

As we were speaking, when I thought about this, this is why we have a good or bad feeling about some people. There’s an intelligence that helps us pick up these subtle frequencies, and we say that we have a gut feeling about right or wrong or what this type of person is like. So he said when we consistently start to practice Ahimsa, we start to become that, we start to become more peaceful, we start to become less violent. Then the more receptive animals start to respond to that and begin to feel safe. So this is the interaction that’s happening. 

I’m sure many people have experienced this with animals and themselves, or even witnessed it, where sometimes animals are attracted to certain people more than others, or you see dogs barking at some people for no reason. So they’re picking up on this feeling. The birds outside, all the animals outside, they’re giving this contentment, they’re singing these songs, they’re showing their gratitude to Mohanji, which he accepts. 

Today as well, something I didn’t quite pick up on, but there was a bit of maybe a divine play happening because the smell of sandalwood appeared in the room from nowhere. I didn’t notice this myself as I have a blocked nose, but somebody else did. It caught their attention. Mohanji simply smiled and said that this is for the animals, they will be able to smell this, and it’s an acknowledgement of their gratitude. 

For me, the lesson witnessed was the tangible scenario where the projection and the transmission out to the world of peace, contentment, and non-violence are being given back. I’m thinking now; it’s really important to cultivate that non-violent lifestyle – to have a peaceful existence and a peaceful lifestyle. So bringing these principles more into my life and doing as much as I can to practice them, I can bring more of that back and have that reciprocated back from the outside world. As I can see and witness, Mohanji is already there in that state, which is why he sees all the animals respond to him with such affection, safety, and love. 

Thank you for listening, and I hope you have a great day ahead.

Day 28 Lesson – The do’s and don’ts of life

Good morning, everybody. 

Today, I wanted to talk about rights and wrongs, or the dos and don’ts of society. Since spending time with Mohanji, I’ve understood more about his perspective and how he sees things differently. Because when I’m speaking with Mohanji, and when he’s also speaking with others, he’s operating from a very different perspective: karmic completion, which means the fulfillment of experiences, which sometimes may not completely fit into societal norms. 

For example, when we do things in life, or when we want to do something in life, maybe our friends have opinions, or families might have opinions about what’s right and wrong. Even the larger society in which we live might have those opinions. But Mohanji is very open; for him, there’s no real right or wrong; there’s only experience. He is not interested in our personal decisions or actions, provided that there’s no violence, that whatever the activity is, that it’s consensual, that there is agreement. 

This is actually quite a nice way of seeing those things. It puts the responsibility fully on ourselves, as he says, “Why would I be interested in what you do or don’t do? As long as it’s not hurting, it’s fine, as long as it’s not causing violence.” Because ultimately, it’s us who’s paying the price for whatever we do; he has nothing to do with that. So we have a responsibility. 

As I spend more time with Mohanji, I understand this more. It’s given more clarity. But before spending time with him, I had some worries and concerns; if I was doing something right or doing something wrong, what would maybe Mohanji think? Does it fit in with the teachings?

I was involved in many things in normal life, like travelling, going out with friends, drinking, partying, the usual. For some reason, I had this tension inside whether what I was doing was right, if it was spiritual. Sometimes, I would even think about whether this would be accepted by Mohanji or by the Mohanji family. Looking back, it seems silly. But I remember it being a real worry at that time. 

And since living with him, it’s actually a relief to gain that clarity and understand that really there is no right or wrong, there’s only experience. He said that he couldn’t stop anyone’s experience because that is their free will. But he reminds us, everything comes with a price. 

Before I recorded this message, I asked Mohanji this morning; I didn’t want to give people the wrong impression that it’s fine to do absolutely anything you want and just descend into anarchy. But it’s the main learning from Mohanji that anything consensual is okay. That’s fine. So it is an agreement. I think most people or many people would automatically think of sex in that respect. This is definitely one aspect of it. But Mohanji considers this very minor because it’s connected just to our instinct for him. But for him, consensual is agreement. 

He gave the example of nature, that when you look at animals, look at lions and deer, something is happening there, which is within the movement of nature. For example, lions will chase a herd of deer, and you’ll see them running through the fields. At some point, one deer will split from the pack. He said that in nature, the deer would understand that there’s the lion’s hunger and accept that it’s probably its time. Maybe it’s one of the older ones. There’s an agreement, a sacrifice, so that’s the type of consensual that Mohanji talks about. 

He said, even if a tree is being chopped down in the prime of its life, and there’s no agreement, you can’t say it’s consensual. Now, you may think as I thought as well, how could a tree tell you: okay, chop me down. But it’s more about there’s a time in a tree’s life. I think even people who manage forests, trees, and places like that can tell when a tree is about to fall, so to clear it out of the way, they’ll chop it down. So that type of understanding, that it’s the time and it’s ready to go.

Also, this agreement should be within whatever people do, between two people who want to have those experiences. So if two people want to have an experience, and they’ve agreed, that’s fine. A collection of people want to have an experience, or maybe society wants to have that experience – that’s okay. But not by inflicting, manipulating, or forcefully doing something. That’s not okay because that is violence. 

So Mohanji doesn’t object to life experiences; if two people want to experience it, if somebody wants to drink alcohol, no problem because he says it’s them who’s having to handle the impact of it, and not himself. 

This extends to something more subtle as well; having respect for other people’s lives and privacy. So everyone has the right to their space, their privacy, and that has to be considered too. Is there an agreement that someone can enter somebody’s personal space, or is there an agreement that their time can be taken? So some more subtle aspects of that message. 

One of the main things which I asked about is relationships with others. So I’ve had relationships of various kinds, and I asked this because maybe other people are curious about this, too. Again, he said, it’s the free will of the people involved in relationships, whatever is happening there. 

But it’s important to remember, especially with people, that it’s easy to create entanglements, which are not easy to get out of. For example, two people have come together, and separation may have happened, but the feelings can still remain. You may be able to say that you’re not with that person anymore, but if we’re carrying the memories, we haven’t actually come out of that relationship. So many times, people in our life are not actually gone because the memories are still there of what we carry. 

In summary, that was about Mohanji’s lessons, which I have picked up on the do’s and don’ts of life, or the rights and wrongs. For him, the only wrong thing is violence. That’s when we’re doing things that aren’t in agreement with other beings, places, people that aren’t consensual. If we want to do something, free will is completely respected, knowing that it often comes with some sort of price. 

Thank you for listening. I hope you have a great day ahead.

|| JAI BRAHMARISHI MOHANJI||

Edited & Published by – Testimonials Team, 30th May 2021

Disclaimer:

The views, opinions, and positions expressed by the authors and those providing comments on these blogs are theirs alone and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of Mohanji, Mohanji Foundation, it’s members, employees or any other individual or entity associated with Mohanji or Mohanji Foundation. We make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, timeliness, suitability or validity of any information presented by individual authors and/or commenters on our blogs and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use.

We reserve the right to delete, edit, or alter in any manner we see fit blog entries or comments that we, in our sole discretion, deem to be obscene, offensive, defamatory, threatening, in violation of trademark, copyright or other laws, of an express commercial nature, or otherwise unacceptable.

— Mohanji Testimonials Team

Humane Airports

By Christopher Greenwood

From racial profiling to humane airports, a vision from Mohanji for the future after a recent incident when travelling by air. We share a summary of the eye-witness account by Chris Greenwood on the harassment at Frankfurt airport and the days following that.

Discrimination at Frankfurt Airport

Yesterday we arrived in Slovenia, and I would have liked to have shared a more positive message this morning. But unfortunately, I had the opportunity to witness discrimination and extreme harassment first-hand at Frankfurt Airport as Mohanji cleared through the security of our transit route from Mumbai to Frankfurt. Then we were transiting from Frankfurt to Ljubljana. I had never seen anything like this before. Obviously, I have a UK passport and a fair complexion, so I have never experienced any discrimination myself. But to witness this was a shock because it’s the first time I’d seen it first-hand. 

As we were travelling, we went through the transit security, and we went into separate lanes because Mohanji was going business class and I was going by the usual. As we went on to the other side, we’d usually wait for each other. I’d passed, and I couldn’t see him. So I collected my bags and looked up the line. I could see him right at the top of the line. He was surrounded and was being interrogated by two police officers. Also, all the security guards were around him too, all the staff who operate those machines which are checking, scanning, x rays and things like this. 

As I got closer, I could see that they were ripping out everything from the bag that he had. He was carrying a backpack. There was obviously a laptop and things like this, but there were also some very important personal documents too. All the cards were indiscriminately taken out of the wallet; every single pocket was emptied, everything was being questioned. 

They started under the premise of checking for explosives. I’ve had that check before; usually, they have a swab of cloth, and they run it across all the materials in the bag and then put it into a machine because it can pick up something that the explosives have. Then they check it, and that’s enough. But here, it just seemed completely over the top. Everything was taken out, everything questioned one by one, “What’s this? What’s this? What’s this?” And then also with money, “How much money do you have? Why are you carrying this money? Where did you get it from?” Completely unnecessary, especially for someone who’s travelling in business in transit; it’s perfectly fine that you’re carrying money. I can only put this down to complete harassment. Towards the end, I could even notice the body language on the usual security staff was changing. I could see that they felt uncomfortable by the situation that was happening. By the end, a third policeman had joined in this interrogation. It was a really unpleasant experience. 

I understood from Mohanji’s previous travels that in Frankfurt Airport, he had experienced the same problems. Afterwards, when I was looking on the internet, some other people were sending me articles; it’s not uncommon apparently for it to happen at that airport. It has a history of it, of people indiscriminately being harassed as they make their way through the airport. It really soured the last leg of the journey yesterday. It was complete disrespect, discrimination and harassment. 

Discrimination at Frankfurt Airport cont.

Yesterday I was on the Frankfurt Airport Facebook page. Ironically, they had posted a day earlier a picture and a hashtag against racism. So I wrote a message on that picture to let them know what happened, what we had suffered or experienced, and that I was the witness to discrimination and racism. The response that I got back was very casual, non-committal, lacking any sort of sense of responsibility. For me, this has given me an insight into how lightly people treat these matters when actually, it’s a very, very important matter for many people. 

After reading the comments, I came to know that many people have experienced a similar situation at that airport; this was not an isolated incident. What that agency is doing is reflecting on the airport as a whole. 

As I think back to the event, all the bags were unpacked. Everything was taken out; every single item chucked into the tray like trash, then just handed over to us in trays, non-apologetic, non-committal, not even a second look, a second glance. It’s that disrespect that needs to change. People should be able to travel in transit and be treated well, treated with respect despite the colour of their skin and their ethnicity. 

It’s worth fighting for 

We’ve been writing letters and contacting every possible authority to make sure that it receives the profile it deserves. It’s an important task. Not because it’s for Mohanji, but because the mindset has been indoctrinated into people over centuries, prejudices have been passed down through societies and families; these have contributed to this situation. The people, who are in power on the ground, can be individually immature or lack the right training in ethics. 

This is a prime example of what the mindset is of the majority of people. We can then look at why Mohanji has created all these platforms, such as the World Consciousness Alliance. It is founded to raise the awareness of this generation to the highest human potentials of kindness, compassion, unconditional love, bringing it up from the levels of anger, hatred, jealousies, prejudices to something much higher, where everybody’s treated well and respected. It’s the same with the Early Birds Club. These platforms are bringing people together beyond all man-made barriers, prejudices and judgments about one another and bring people to a unity where everybody is respected, regardless of race, religion, caste, culture, creed, and colour. 

What was experienced in Frankfurt were utter discrimination, contempt, and real racial profiling. It’s very, very important that we all stand up and fight for things like this. Having spent time with Mohanji, he’s always maintained that for him, all lives matter. This includes people, animals, plants, all species; everything has its relevance in the world. We should meet everybody with equality and respect. Nobody’s higher; nobody’s lower. Everybody has their place. So this is what is worth the fight. 

As for me, going through these past two days, it’s been a real experience and a practical lesson and making sure that I do what needs to be done now. This includes the speed at which we’re working to make sure people have been contacted and that all the letters have been checked by the relevant people. Life presented this situation; there’s no rehearsal. It’s a practical lesson of speaking when you need to speak, writing when you need to write and acting when you need to. All activities are moving ahead, and we’ll see what comes from this in time. But for sure, we’re taking this as far as it can possibly go. 

Act at the right time 

We are using this time very well to do what we can to raise the visibility of this deplorable incident to the highest authorities possible. And multiple friends are now taking this forward to give support which is amazing. So, it’s moving forward; we have momentum. The purpose is not for apologies; it’s for a complete shift in mindset, where people are treated with respect regardless of the colour of their skin, to end this racial profiling that’s happening. 

Looking back on what Mohanji has spoken in all the lessons that I’ve shared, the whole effort for me is making the best use of the opportunity that has been given. This didn’t have to happen to Mohanji, but it did. And because of his standing in the world, people will take notice. Even if a security guard now thinks twice before performing such an act, we would have helped others. The lesson which I can take away from this is that everything and everybody has their time, every situation has its time, configuration, place. And if we don’t act at that point in time and don’t do our best, then the rest of life might not give us the opportunity. This can be seen with many things in life; you can look at great artists, entertainers, politicians; there was always a time when they were present when they were relevant. In this context, today, this incident of racial profiling has relevance now. In five years, maybe not so; whilst we can, we’re using the momentum to take this as far as it can go. 

Like this incident of racial profiling, we’re doing the best that we can whilst it’s present and with us now. Mohanji shared before in satsangs that many people are chasing something which they don’t have and are aspiring for something which is not with them now. In that bargain, they’re missing today. Or waiting for a better opportunity to do something tomorrow, “Okay, it’ll be better if I do this tomorrow. Maybe I’ll write about it tomorrow.” But then there’s no guarantee that this will come. Whilst goals are good while setting a vision and setting a plan to achieve something is also good if it’s at the expense of missing today, and in the pretext of achieving something tomorrow, then we miss what’s with us now, that opportunity for fulfilment at each and every moment because the future will be different. The whole configuration of situations, and even ourselves, our personal makeup, our mindset, how we think, will be different. This is why today, with this practical thing which we’re doing, it’s a lesson of what needs to be done today should be done today and to the best of our effort.

Making a change 

We’re moving forward with good momentum to bring awareness of this terrible incident of racial profiling and sheer racism that happened to Mohanji at Frankfurt Airport. This is not because we’re looking for an apology. It’s because it’s completely against what we stand for as a family, as an organization. We’re doing it because we want change; we want to change the pattern of injustice that’s systematic across many parts of the world, particularly Frankfurt Airport. Looking into this matter in more detail, I’ve seen many more accounts of people who have experienced similar situations, harassment, abuse, humiliation, all under the pretext of security checks, even to the point where people are now afraid in some cases to travel through airports and security screening. It is terrible when you think about it; you’re making legitimate travel somewhere, but you’re completely concerned as you’re going through that security check-in, what’s going to happen to you, how you’re going to be treated if you’re going to be subjected to abuse. 

So this is a change which we want to make so that nobody else has to suffer this. It can be practical what that change is: right training for the people who are in these positions of power, on how to handle people with respect, with good ethics, and good behaviour. Not to treat people as a suspect when they’re moving through these airports. There could be some way for people who have experienced this to give feedback so that there can be a learning for the airports – a system where they can recognize what’s happening, maybe even a ranking. Things can be done, and this is what we’re pushing for. 

I was thinking about the usual responses, which can happen in a situation like this because now the profile has been raised to quite a level. What are the typical things that people will do? What will people say? I think the usual way, which is already being experienced now, is starting with one – it didn’t happen – minimizing it, trivializing it, which is sheer avoidance. Then the next one will be, “Well, that’s obviously just a routine check. That happens to everybody. The police and the guards were doing their job; the world is a dangerous place, those checks are important.” Basically, trying to justify the situation and the actions. Again, completely avoiding it, escapism. Then I think the third one, if they can’t handle what’s coming, and they can’t accept any mistakes or find any other way to avoid it, then what could happen is that they look to slander the person that’s involved. They talk bad about the person. They make them look like a demon so that whatever happened to them is justified, “Okay, he was a bad guy, so what you did was right anyway.” And they can even pay people for this. 

I was thinking through these because, under pressure to attempt to save themselves and their face, they could resort to many options, trying to make a diversion from the actual issue at hand. They can shame a person by justifying their actions.

I thought that there might even be more paid slander so that the whole issue is eclipsed and avoided. But we keep going because we have a clear purpose now, and that is to bring a change to this pattern of injustice. 

Ahimsa (non-violence)

Today I wanted to start with a quote, which I shared some weeks back, that I feel has permanent relevance. It is from Albert Einstein. He said,

“The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.”

Albert Einstein

Yesterday Mohanji gave a very powerful meeting, and clarification about the reasons why we’ve decided to take a stand against racism, racial profiling, and the harassment people are subjected to at the airport security checks. Especially in Frankfurt Airport, where he was harassed, which happened once before as well. 

In this meeting, he clarified with all the country heads, all the leaders of the teams, the advisors about the incident at Frankfurt and why we’re making a stand. This is not for his apology. This is not for him personally; it’s to bring a change in the world where no one else has to suffer that harassment, racism and outright discrimination. From the incident to now, it’s been incredibly quick. All the activities have been happening, making sure that things are visible for people and that the right people are being contacted, such as higher authorities. 

Over the past day, some people had worries, concerns and confusions on whether our activities to raise the visibility of this issue were in line with Ahimsa or non-violence, one of our core principles. So Mohanji clarified Ahimsa really well. He said that Ahimsa is not creating violence in thoughts, words or actions. It’s ensuring that no one is harmed because of our thoughts, words and actions. It’s about our interaction with the world. But that doesn’t mean that you lie down and become a doormat for everybody. You also have to protect yourself and take action based on the merits of the issue at hand. Not that you go out and attack somebody, but you assess what it is and then take appropriate action. 

After the meeting yesterday, we spoke some more. He explained it in a way that sometimes you have to act. For example, if somebody is coming to you with a knife, intending to harm you or kill you, what would you do? You can’t ask them to sit down and meditate and think about what they’re doing. You have to handle it as it is. Or if a mosquito is coming and biting, you can’t calmly sit, chant and hope it will go away. You have to do something about it. 

The incident at Frankfurt is not just personal; it’s for a much larger good too, where many people have experienced this treatment. And probably all across the world as well, something similar is happening. These people don’t have the platform, the voice, or the reach which we do. So we can do something to use it well. 

To help my understanding as well, he shared some more clarifications or illustrations about Ahimsa. We spoke about Krishna, and he said that like Krishna, he likes to be practical. Krishna waged many wars; many people died in those battles. Pretty much all the kings at the time were wiped out. So in itself, the act of war, fighting, of death could be seen as violence, and there would have been some. But it was done for a much larger purpose, for dharma, for a greater good. Like that, each action can be taking on what it’s doing for others too.

Something else which I liked from Mohanji’s briefing yesterday with all of the country heads and team leads is that he reiterated that we should be speaking when we can, when we have the time, when we have the opportunity, and when we have a voice. He said that’s especially important because if we don’t, if we’re passive, then this is the example we are setting for the next generation. And we leave them also the burden of what we had to carry. 

Speaking out 

For me personally, this has been a real living example of the teachings, lessons and messages that I’ve shared over the past weeks and months because it’s almost as if it all came together in this situation to give a real example of how Mohanji approaches life. And the way he approaches life gives me the best lessons. Suppose I was to just think personally about my experience with this situation and share some of the things that I feel in my growth since meeting Mohanji. In that case, I can see a change from how I’ve handled this situation to how I probably would have done two years ago. I probably would have been very reluctant to speak about this; I would have had a lot of fear and unsure of what I should do. 

But when I wrote my posts, which was my eye witness account, I felt that I had to speak because I had witnessed it; I was there. It could have been anybody, but it wasn’t; it was me. I felt a need to share what I’d seen, so at least people understood how the situation happened. A year and a half ago, maybe I wouldn’t have done this, but this time around, it was a natural thing for me; there’s been an injustice; I’ve seen it, so I should speak about it. 

I feel that for me, thinking about it demonstrated that some of the teachings that Mohanji has shared have at least settled somewhere. I can say I’ve taken them all in; I will never say this because there’s always much, much more to learn. But at least that aspect of not being worried about what people think, what people might say, how I would be seen, has completely gone. There was no second thought to do this, so this is something which I recognized. 

Since then, being close to Mohanji and seeing how he is approaching this whole situation is again incredibly inspiring. It’s re-establishing everything that was said before in many talks. If we have the opportunity to speak, we should, especially when there are many other people out there who would have experienced this situation and didn’t have the opportunity or platform to share their voice. 

Mohanji made a really great podcast that is coming out today, titled “We must speak because they cannot“. It is not just about this incident at Frankfurt, but this is for every being that doesn’t have a voice – we should speak for them, we should take that as a responsibility. 

What inspires me about Mohanji’s approach to this situation is that he’s willing to take this all the way. He’s not worried about what may or what may not happen. For him, there’s a clear purpose, and that’s to bring about a change where everybody is respected; no one should feel unsafe when they’re legitimately travelling through Frankfurt airport or any other airport, no one should experience security harassment. All these agencies that are involved in that process should adhere to good ethics. 

This is the goal. How we will reach there will change, we have to be flexible. Mohanji said openly that something good might happen, something bad may happen. People could shame, defame, and give slander in an effort to save themselves. We don’t know what will happen. But what he is clear on, though, is that we’re moving for a purpose. As he said before, whilst our heart is beating, we should do something for the world; we should do something for a purpose. Not just to sleep, eat, drink, and other things like that. We can make a difference. 

For me, when I read between that a little bit more, it shows to me that he has no real attachment to any image or idea of the image about himself. He’s willing to go all the way out there, put himself out there, regardless of what may come. And he knows that whatever comes, he’ll face it then. Also, he’s focused on purpose. He’s doing what needs to be done now, today because it happened now. As he’s mentioned, and as I’ve shared in other lessons before, there are no rehearsals in life. It’s now; doing what you can now. 

Today, we’ll keep going, and more people are coming to support this. It may not be possible that from this, everybody begins to love all beings, all creations and wants to live in complete harmony. But possibly, and at least, they should be having that basic level of respect and understanding, where people are treated equally as humans with decency. Then there’ll be humane airports, which is one of the hashtags which we’re now promoting as well. We want to have humane airports where everybody’s treated with respect.

|| JAI BRAHMARISHI MOHANJI||

Edited & Published by – Testimonials Team, 15th April 2021

Disclaimer:

The views, opinions, and positions expressed by the authors and those providing comments on these blogs are theirs alone and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of Mohanji, Mohanji Foundation, it’s members, employees or any other individual or entity associated with Mohanji or Mohanji Foundation. We make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, timeliness, suitability or validity of any information presented by individual authors and/or commenters on our blogs and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use.

We reserve the right to delete, edit, or alter in any manner we see fit blog entries or comments that we, in our sole discretion, deem to be obscene, offensive, defamatory, threatening, in violation of trademark, copyright or other laws, of an express commercial nature, or otherwise unacceptable.

Mohanji Testimonials team

Ahimsa, the Vegan Way – a True Inspiration from Guru Mohanji

Author: Shyama Jeyaseelan, UK
As Mohanji says, “If you are sure the world must change its ways, the only way to make it happen is to start with changing your ways. Transformation is essentially individualistic before it becomes collective. And the world is what we have made of it through generations of insensitive existence.

Ahimsa the Vegan Way - an inspiration from Mohanji

I would like to share a transformation that took place within me with Mohanji’s love and grace. Year 2016 was very special for me. It was the year when the sacred pilgrimage to Kailash became a reality, Mohanji was in the UK for Guru Poornima and the UK retreat, I received Kriya initiation from Mohanji and the year when I had the privilege of being at the Skanda Vale temple in Switzerland for the inauguration ceremony of the Somaskanda Moorthi while Mohanji was present. It was also the year Ahimsa the Vegan Café, a dream inspired by Mohanji, opened in London!

Ahimsa the Vegan Way 2 - an inspiration from Mohanji

On Guru Poornima day, an evening programme with Mohanji was organised in central London. I had the blessed opportunity to cook and serve food to Mohanji that evening. It was a simple meal but Mohanji’s kind “Thank you” made me very joyful inside. During the meal, I shared a feeling that had been bothering me for a while.

I mentioned that when our cats are unwell, I feel very sad and do my best to take care of them to make them better. However, even knowing how much cows and calves are suffering in dairy farms to provide us with milk, I was still unable to give up eating dairy! It made me sad how insensitive I was being towards the suffering of other beings. Mohanji simply said, “Don’t worry, it will happen.”

My family had been vegetarian for many years, but ate eggs and dairy products. Until meeting Mohanji I had been unaware of the horrors of dairy farming. As I read articles or watched videos of the dairy industry, I prayed that things would change in the industry. I also realised that by becoming vegan, along with many others, I would be able to contribute towards positive changes in society. Although the intellect knew what was the right thing to do, the mind always won with many excuses. I didn’t want to give up my cakes and coffees! That summer, after the retreat and being treated to beautiful vegan food for 4 days, I came home determined to stop eating dairy. Disappointingly, for various reasons it did not happen. Then the 2017 retreat took place and I was thinking again on the way home if I was going to be strong enough to do it this time.

The next day I was cooking paneer and two things happened simultaneously. I remembered Mohanji saying at some point during the retreat that the Guru we are seeking is within us. At that moment, I had the amazing feeling of Mohanji’s presence filling up my body. As Guru and God merged into one, the decision of becoming vegan was one of the easiest choices to make. How can I give the most compassionate Guru something obtained by means of cruelty and suffering? That moment was the turning point for me to change.

The 1st week after I stopped eating dairy products, I felt very light physically. Emotionally and mentally, it was joyful to know that I was contributing in some small way to make positive changes to society. Approximately 542,000 people in UK are vegan now! When I say Brahmarpanam, the food prayer before my meals, I have the happiness and satisfaction that I am offering sattvic food to my Guru and God.

Ahimsa the Vegan Way 3 - an inspiration from Mohanji

Looking back, I realise whatever sadhana I do on a daily and weekly basis had started the change in me, but the process was accelerated by Mohanji’s love, grace and blessings. My heart is full of love and gratitude to Mohanji for giving me the strength to change. The bhajan below is sung by one of the children at the Sai centre. The words are so beautiful that it melts my heart every time I hear it. I also had the privilege of offering it to Mohanji during the retreat last year.

“You are my heart, my soul, my own

You are my own eternal guide

You are the one I adore

You are the sun, the moon in the sky

You are the stars that shine at night”

You are my all, my beloved Mohanji.

With eternal love and gratitude,

Shyama Jeyaseelan

Disclaimer:

The views, opinions and positions expressed by the authors and those providing comments on these blogs are theirs alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of Mohanji, Mohanji Foundation, it’s members, employees or any other individual or entity associated with Mohanji or Mohanji Foundation. We make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, timeliness, suitability or validity of any information presented by individual authors and/or commenters on our blogs and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use.

We reserve the right to delete, edit, or alter in any manner we see fit blog entries or comments that we, in our sole discretion, deem to be obscene, offensive, defamatory, threatening, in violation of trademark, copyright or other laws, of an express commercial nature, or otherwise unacceptable.