Lessons living with Mohanji – Days 135 & 136

Christopher Greenwood

Day 135 Lesson – Making a change 

Good morning everybody. I hope that you’re doing well. 

Awareness is increasing about the blatant racism incident that happened to Mohanji at Frankfurt Airport, and more people are coming forward to support it. Momentum is building, and we are exploring all avenues to bring this incident to those who can make a change. The reason we are doing this is to change the pattern of injustice that is systemic at Frankfurt Airport and others across the world. We want people to be treated with respect regardless of their race, nationality or skin colour. 

Since my post on FB, many people have now come forward to share their experiences of outright discrimination under the pretext of “security checks”; through my research, I read about many such incidents. This change is needed so no one else has to experience this harassment. People are now afraid to travel through airports and security screening, which is terrible when you think about it. You’re making legitimate travel somewhere, but you’re extremely concerned as you’re going through that security check-in about what’s going to happen to you, how you’re going to be treated and if you’re going to be subjected to abuse. 

 This is the change we want to make so nobody else has to suffer. It can be practical steps in what that change is about, namely:

  1. The right training for the people in these positions of power is to handle people with respect, good ethics, and good behaviour.
  2. Not to treat people as suspects when they’re moving through these airports. People who have experienced this can give feedback so there can be a learning for the airport authorities – a system where they can recognize what’s happening, maybe even a ranking. Things can be done, and this is what we’re pushing for. 

Yesterday, I was pondering on the usual responses, which can happen in a situation like this as the profile has been raised to quite a level. What are the typical things that people will do? What will people say? I think the usual way, which is being experienced now is usually as below:

  1. It didn’t happen – minimizing it, trivializing it, which is sheer avoidance.
  2. Then the next one will be – “Well, that’s obviously just a routine check. That happens to everybody. The police and guards were doing their job; the world is dangerous. Those checks are important.” So basically, trying to justify the situation and the actions. Again, altogether avoiding it, escapism. 
  3. If they can’t handle what’s coming, can’t accept any mistakes, or can’t find any other way to avoid it, then what could happen is that they look to slander the person involved. They talk bad about the person. They make them look like a demon so that whatever happened to them is justified, “Okay, he was a bad guy, so what you did was right anyway.” And they can even pay people for this. 

I was thinking on these lines because, under pressure to attempt to save themselves and face, they could resort to many options, trying to make a diversion from the actual issue at hand. They can shame a person into justifying their actions.

 I remember someone telling me about an incident that happened in Pakistan. One man was working for a bank, and he killed his boss. This was because he had asked for a salary increase or a promotion, and the boss hadn’t given it to him. He wasn’t happy with that and killed the boss. 

When the police handled this person, he said his boss had spoken badly about the Quran and defamed the Prophet, speaking all sorts of bad things. So straight away, this became a huge thing, and this person became a hero as he had taken revenge on someone who spoke badly about the Quran and the Prophet. It completely eclipsed the fact that he’d murdered someone, and then the court should have meted out the justice he deserved for committing murder in the country. 

I thought that there might even be a paid slander or smear campaign so that the whole issue could be eclipsed and avoided. But we keep going because we have a clear purpose now: to bring a change to this pattern of injustice. 

Hope you have a great day ahead.

Day 136 Lesson – Ahimsa 

Good morning everybody. 

Today, I wanted to start with a quote I shared some weeks back that has enduring relevance. Albert Einstein said, “The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.” Yesterday Mohanji gave a compelling talk and clarification about why we’ve decided to take a stand against racism, racial profiling, and the harassment people are subjected to at the airport security checks. Especially in Frankfurt Airport, where he was harassed, which happened once before. 

In this meeting with the country heads, the leaders of the teams, and the advisors, Mohanji clarified the incident at Frankfurt and the reason for taking a stand. This is not personal; it’s to bring a change in the world so that no one else has to suffer that harassment, racism and outright discrimination. Since the incident, all the activities have been happening to make sure that things are visible to people; the right people and higher authorities are being contacted. 

Over the past days, some people had worries, concerns and confusion about whether our activities to raise the visibility of this issue were in line with Ahimsa or non-violence, one of our core principles. So Mohanji clarified Ahimsa really well. 

He said that Ahimsa is not creating violence in thoughts, words or actions. It’s ensuring that no one is harmed because of our thoughts, words and actions. So it’s about our interaction with the world. But that doesn’t mean that we lie down and become a doormat for everybody. We also have to protect ourselves and take action based on the merits of the issue at hand. So not that we outwardly go out and attack somebody, but we assess what it is and then take the appropriate action. 

After the meeting yesterday, we spoke some more. Mohanji explained it in a way that sometimes you have to act. For example, what would you do if somebody is coming to you with a knife, intending to harm you or kill you? You can’t ask them to sit down and meditate and think about what they’re doing. You have to handle it as it is. Or, if a mosquito is coming and biting, you can’t calmly sit, chant and hope it will go away. You have to do something about it. 

The incident with Frankfurt is not personal. It’s for a much larger good where many people have experienced this traumatic treatment, and probably all across the world, something similar is happening. These people don’t have the platform, the voice, or outreach, which we do.

He shared some more clarifications or illustrations about Ahimsa to further my understanding. We spoke about Krishna, and he said that, like Krishna, he likes to be practical. Krishna waged many wars, and many people died in those battles. Pretty much all the kings at the time were wiped out. The act of war, fighting, and death could be seen as violence, and there would have been some. But it was done for a much larger purpose; for Dharma, for a greater good. So like that, each action can be taking on what it’s doing for others.

Something else which I liked from Mohanji’s briefing yesterday with all of the country heads and team leaders is that he reiterated that we should speak when we can, when we have the time, when we have the opportunity, and when we have a voice. He said that’s especially important because if we don’t, if we’re passive, then this is the example we are setting for the next generation to come. And we leave them also the burden of what we had to carry. 

I hope you have a great day ahead and will speak to you soon.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is chris-with-m.jpeg


|| JAI BRAHMARISHI MOHANJI ||

Edited & Published by – Testimonials Team, 19th June 2022

Disclaimer:

The views, opinions, and positions expressed by the authors and those providing comments on these blogs are theirs alone and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of Mohanji, Mohanji Foundation, it’s members, employees or any other individual or entity associated with Mohanji or Mohanji Foundation. We make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, timeliness, suitability or validity of any information presented by individual authors and/or commenters on our blogs and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use.

We reserve the right to delete, edit, or alter in any manner we see fit blog entries or comments that we, in our sole discretion, deem to be obscene, offensive, defamatory, threatening, in violation of trademark, copyright or other laws, of an express commercial nature, or otherwise unacceptable.

Mohanji Testimonials team

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-13.png



Being With Mohanji – The Transformation

By Ruby Nair, USA

Mohanji_the Teacher.JPG
Guru Comes to You At The Right Time

“Teachers happen when the student is ready. And the teacher is always in relation with the student. When a student happens, a teacher happens. Teacher is a state just like student is a state. The teacher or the student are never permanent in their roles. A teacher can be a father, a husband, a lover, a pedestrian, a shopper, a barber, a cook or any other role a human being may play in his or her lifetime. The right knowledge will come to you at the right time, through a person, a book or a life experience. This is the truth of existence.”

Below, I share, from the heart, how my life changed from a mundane existence to one of joy, peace, gratitude and selfless actions through the appearance of a Guru at a time of need in answer to a prayer.
What have I gained by being with Mohanji is a vast subject that can’t be put down into mere words. I contemplated on this matter for a couple of days and as I sat with my husband talking about certain things, I ended up discussing with him all that I have gained by being with Mohanji. It was so simple yet complicated.

Mohanji_simple
Simple Yet Complicated!

My life before Mohanji was very uncertain on many levels. From my childhood, I had been one of the weird kids who always felt different and shy inside. On some levels, I can say that I had lived a turbulent childhood which continued into most of my early adult life. First, it was distant family problems. Then as I grew older, I realized that I never fit in with a lot of groups because I was never really interested in what they talked about. I was a party goer for most of my late teens and thought life was just about partying and spending money.
After getting married and visiting Kerala for the first time in 2004, I had such a profound experience at the Guruvayurappan Krishna temple, which brought tears and intense love to my heart, that shook me. That’s when I realized that there was something tangible in these temples. So I became obsessed with visiting temples and praying – just thanking God for everything.
However, marriage also brought a sense of responsibility towards fixing my family matters. My husband and I took it upon ourselves to visit different temples, perform countless pujas, prayers in my name or their names to uplift them and myself from all the troubles and ignorance. There was this compulsion in me that kept me going for years and I can recall most of our married life was spent on fixing other people – my family, etc. I felt burdened at times and cried out numerous times to God to please end this suffering of mine as there was no end to my turbulent life. Things did improve in my life but I never felt contented and always felt like there was something more to do.
Since I had filled my life with trying to help others while ignoring my own pain, I never knew how to deal with things when they got difficult as there was no anchor in my life to tell me it will be okay in the end. My husband was always there no matter what, but I was looking for something higher to connect to. I felt abused, disrespected and unloved on many occasions by many people in my life. I was a machine living for others and trying to make them happy while I was unhappy on many levels.
The above describes my life after my marriage basically from 2003 to 2012 – in pain, in depression at times, feeling lonely, betrayed, etc. After 2012, my life changed drastically again after visiting a Shiva Temple in Kauai, Hawaii, where I truly believed there were Gods, angels and higher beings alive among us, helping and guiding us. It brought a lot of change in my life which cultivated patience and faith. I gave up certain dietary things as well as alcohol, which I took on special occasions and learned could be a hindrance to one’s spiritual path. I became aware that one’s purification and penance was very important in finding God. To better myself, I started fasting, serving family by cooking food for them, ignoring their cold remarks, and learning how to restrain myself.
During this time, I also read the book “Autobiography of Yogi” by Paramahansa Yogananda. This book helped me realize the importance of a Guru and how having love for Him transcends any physical or conditional love that I was used to. This drove me to seek and question if there was a Guru for me as well in this life. I installed Mahavatar Babaji’s picture in my temple even though it felt kind of strange because I had grown up with the idea that we only install and pray to idols of deities and not to a human beings. Even though I knew Babaji was beyond human definitions, it was just something that was hard for me to do.
From 2012 to 2015, I did meditations on my own where I would just force myself to sit and contemplate on Babaji or just nothing. I prayed to God to send me a Guru. After hearing from somewhere that when one pours water on a Shiva lingam and asks with a pure heart, God surely brings that into our life. Without being aware, Mohanji came into my life slowly, but my ignorance was too deep to even recognize Him. In 2015 I found Mohanji’s blog through the grace of Babaji and I was able to meet Him physically in 2016. Meeting Him was also very turbulent for me due to my own negative self. I had to shed a lot to see His divinity. This was the first gift He gave me – the ability to connect to Him despite the darkness surrounding me, while dissolving my ignorance so that I could see Him in a different light and purity.

MOhanji_ruby nair1.png
Light & Purity with Mohanji

During one of my trips with Mohanji, He casually mentioned that having my second daughter accelerated my path to meeting Him, but I was destined to meet Him anyway, probably later in time. Many are His subtle ways that I can’t even begin to describe them.
The big question is what has been so different after meeting Him. Well, all my compulsions to fix things, others, or situations have gone. I no longer feel that I am in any control to fix anyone let alone help them, unless they themselves are seeking guidance. If I do happen to help someone, I have realized that it is not me but the energy of God working through me to help that person, so the ownership or doership has gone. I have also been initiated to Mai-Tri healing, so I can serve others selflessly and bring Mohanji’s healing to others.
I feel protected for the first time in my life. Not that I didn’t feel protected before, but this is where I know if I am in trouble or something is bothering me, He will be there no matter the time or space. It’s very comforting to know someone is always with me, guiding me no matter what.
I have also become stronger in myself and have more faith in myself and my abilities. I no longer wish to get gratification from others or listen to others. I know I am self-sufficient and I am perfect the way I am, despite being laughed at numerous times throughout my life. It is knowing that all of us are different, unique and loved by the Divine just as we are. Even though lack of acceptance is still there on minute levels, it is now a work in progress.
Another great thing I have gained from being with Mohanji is His global family. I just love meeting different people from all over the world and connecting with them instantly. It is like they are my real family at times and it brings me so much joy just to share love and stories with them. It’s a connection on a different level that I never experienced outside of His family.

MOhanji_ruby nair Kailash.png
Connection at a different Level – Kailash Trip

Mohanji has also brought forth more awareness to the suffering of animals. Due to this I have been vegan for a year and have never been so happy to realize that I had the strength to give up on desires that are so hard to give up in one’s life. Now, it’s a lifestyle of Ahimsa which was just a thought before meeting Him. This decision has helped me to avoid feeling the guilt of consuming something that was snatched from another being. Because if the roles were reversed, I would not want the same thing inflicted on my loved ones.
So far, the most important thing I feel I have gained is that Mohanji anchors me in the present. I no longer look elsewhere; He has given me something strong and tangible to hold on to. This feeling was what I was looking for all my life until I met Him. I realized that if this anchor had been available to me earlier, I would have been less turbulent within myself and more stable. He has given me stability that I thought I would never achieve in this life. I have cried to God when I couldn’t handle things and have asked Him to end my life, but now I don’t have such thoughts. I feel happy, loved, accepted and grateful to have this human birth where I have been given this much awareness. Simply put, Mohanji helped me become a better me, someone I love.

MOhanji_ruby nair MP
Love and Acceptance From My Guru – Machu Picchu

This was my humble attempt to pen down my most intimate thoughts. I feel privileged to even be on this path and to be able to express my gratitude to Mohanji. Without Him, I probably wouldn’t even have the strength to face, accept and write all these things. Thank you Father for everything and coming into my life.
With deep gratitude and love,
Ruby Nair, USA

Disclaimer:

The views, opinions and positions expressed by the authors and those providing comments on these blogs are theirs alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of Mohanji, Mohanji Foundation, it’s members, employees or any other individual or entity associated with Mohanji or Mohanji Foundation. We make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, timeliness, suitability or validity of any information presented by individual authors and/or commenters on our blogs and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use.
We reserve the right to delete, edit, or alter in any manner we see fit blog entries or comments that we, in our sole discretion, deem to be obscene, offensive, defamatory, threatening, in violation of trademark, copyright or other laws, of an express commercial nature, or otherwise unacceptable.